ES News email

2020-09-15T11:01:33.670Z

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson returns to Downing Street following the weekly Cabinet meeting at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office:

Getty

2020-09-15T08:13:58.776Z

Home Secretary Priti Patel said “we are absolutely” not breaking the law. 

She said that the withdrawal Agreement was designed to safeguard the integrity of the United Kingdom.

“It is not about breaking the law,” she said.  

Ms Patel added: “Parliament is sovereign when it comes to how international treaties are not just interpreted but applied through acts of Parliament.” 

Asked whether Brandon Lewis was wrong about saying the Tories were breaking the law, she said: “We are absolutely not doing that,” adding: 

The purpose of the bill is to ensure we preserve the integrity of the United Kingdom. 

2020-09-15T08:04:19.746Z

Home Secretary Priti Patel defended the controversial clauses in the Internal Market Bill.

She told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “This is a safety net. And that is why we have introduced this in this particular Bill.”

2020-09-15T08:04:13.296Z

Priti Patel has been defending the Internal Market Bill on Sky News:

(Sky News)

2020-09-15T07:41:16.710Z

Boris Johnson is facing a huge rebellion from his own party:

PM warned of rebellion despite Brexit bill clearing first hurdle

Boris Johnson has been warned of a potential rebellion among his own MPs despite his controversial plan to override key elements of the Brexit deal clearing its first hurdle.

The Prime Minister said the legislation was necessary to prevent the EU taking an “extreme and unreasonable” interpretation of provisions in the Withdrawal Agreement.

2020-09-15T07:28:53.553Z

On the UK Internal Market Bill, Home Secretary Priti Patel said the Government is ensuring it stays true to the Good Friday Agreement.

“When it comes to preserving the integrity of the UK and clearly delivering for the people of Northern Ireland when it comes to the Good Friday Agreement, we’ve said from day one… that we would always stand by our word and not compromise when it comes to unfettered access in goods and services but also standing by the Good Friday Agreement,” she said on BBC Breakfast.

“We are ensuring the UK Internal Market Bill stays true to that principle that is why we are bringing this bill forward.”

2020-09-15T07:28:42.560Z

Andrew Mitchell says he won’t back parts of the Bill: 

Andrew Mitchell said he backed large parts of the Bill, but would not back it unless it was amended, stating: “To ask members of the parliamentary party to walk through the Lobbies quite deliberately voting to breach international law is something which I cannot do.

“And which is causing very considerable anxiety and worry on the backbenches.

“We all want to help the Government with these negotiations, but to do that flies in the face of all British tradition.”

2020-09-15T07:26:28.700Z

The Border and Protocol Delivery Group document, seen by the Guardian, also details predictions of two hours of extra delays for Eurostar customer. 

2020-09-15T07:14:12.170Z

Good morning! Here’s a recap of everything you need to know going into September 15:

Your morning briefing: What you should know for Tuesday, September 15

PM warned of rebellion despite Brexit bill clearing first hurdle in Commons Boris Johnson has been warned of a potential rebellion among his own MPs despite his controversial plan to override key elements of the Brexit deal clearing its first hurdle.

The Prime Minister said the legislation was necessary to prevent the EU taking an “extreme and unreasonable” interpretation of provisions in the Withdrawal Agreement.

2020-09-15T07:12:49.006Z

A Tory former Cabinet minister has said it would be “unacceptable” to breach international law with legislation to override the Brexit divorce deal.

Andrew Mitchell hit out at clauses in the Government’s Internal Market Bill.

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “The proposition that we should march through the Lobby as lawmakers and say that we are going to ignore and disavow a law that we have passed, to do with the rule of law, that is completely unacceptable.”

2020-09-14T21:48:17.616Z

Boris Johnson’s new Brexit bill clears first Commons hurdle despite growing Tory revolt 

2020-09-14T21:32:39.583Z

BREAKING

The UK Internal Market Bill has cleared its first Commons hurdle after MPs approved giving it a second reading by 340 votes to 263, majority 77.

2020-09-14T21:17:29.480Z

BREAKING 

Labour’s amendment to block the United Kingdom Internal Market Bill from receiving a second reading was defeated by 349 votes to 213, majority 136.

2020-09-14T21:06:02.080Z

Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove said that the UK is committed to making a success of its negotiations with the EU.

    
“What this Bill is not doing is not walking away from negotiation with the European Union. Those negotiations go on,” Mr Gove told the Commons.

     
“We’re committed to making a success of those negotiations. What this Bill is not about is abandoning the Withdrawal Agreement, the Withdrawal Agreement is there, we are safeguarding the rights of three million EU citizens in the UK, just as EU nations are safeguarding the rights of one million UK citizens in the EU.

    
“And this Bill is certainly not about declining to implement the Northern Ireland Protocol.”

2020-09-14T20:51:38.170Z

Senior Tories warn Boris Johnson they will not support Brexit bill which breaks international law 

2020-09-14T20:42:11.883Z

The debate continues in the Commons…

Alliance MP Stephen Farry (North Down) said any border on the island of Ireland would create “fresh hostility”.

    
He said: “The protocol is, in effect, the bare minimum to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland.”

     
Mr Farry added: “It is pragmatically easier to manage an interface down the Irish Sea than it is across the land border. We’re talking about the difference between seven air and sea crossings versus 270 land crossings.”

     
Tory MP Danny Kruger (Devizes) said Boris Johnson “was at fault for believing the EU when they said they would negotiate in good faith”.

     
He added: “There’s been much criticism this evening of the Prime Minister and I think he is at fault, or he was at fault.

     
“He was at fault for believing the EU when they said they would negotiate in good faith. He was at fault when… they said they would respect the integrity of the UK and of our internal market. But he’s not at fault for trying to remedy the situation with this legislation.”

2020-09-14T20:06:51.590Z

Boris Johnson urges MPs to support controversial Brexit bill to guarantee ‘political integrity’ of UK 

2020-09-14T19:26:53.433Z

‘Respecting the rule of law has never been more precious due to the pandemic’

New Lib Dem leader Sir Ed Davey said: “If we are to beat this dreadful virus people need to obey the law, even when some of the emergency Covid laws are amongst the most draconian the British people have faced for centuries.

“So the rule of law has never been more precious to the health of our nation. And yet this Prime Minister has chosen this moment to trash the rule of law.

    
“This House must stop him, tonight.”

2020-09-14T18:50:27.760Z

Senior Conservative MP Sir Bernard Jenkin told the Commons: “Much has been said about the potential to lose the respect of the international community but what will other nations think if this great and sovereign nation cannot bring itself to accept we made a mistake ratifying this agreement?

     
“Some of us warned about it at the time. The UK will gain respect if we extricate ourselves from the worst aspects of this agreement that have the capacity to impose laws upon our country with even less democratic legitimacy than under our previous membership of the EU.”

      
SDLP leader Colum Eastwood quoted Boris Johnson hailing the Withdrawal Agreement as a great deal, adding: “How can anybody trust the word of this Prime Minister when he does a deal not even a year ago and he comments about it in those terms – and now he is ripping up that agreement.”

     
He also told MPs: “This may all turn out to be a dead cat, but let me tell this Government very clearly – more and more people every single day are saying to me, people you wouldn’t even expect, that this union is very close to becoming a dead duck.”

2020-09-14T18:43:27.153Z

Tory MP Imran Ahmad Khan (Wakefield) said that he cannot vote for legislation which will break international law.

     
He said: “I’m an ardent supporter of Brexit and look forward eagerly to the opportunity to bolster the United Kingdom’s position by becoming an independent, self-governing nation possessed of the confidence that flows from our vision and principled values.

     
“Whilst I stand four-square behind the Government’s policies and objectives, including those advanced by the UK Internal Market Bill, I cannot vote for legislation that a Cabinet minister stated from the despatch box will break international law.”

     
He added: “Half the countries of the EU are in breach of their various treaty obligations. Germany and France both choose to deliberately breach their EU treaty of commitments relating to budget deficit limits and others are famous for being selective in deciding which rules to follow.

    
“However, the UK has always held itself to a higher standard. Our principles of fair play and freedom, underpinned by the rule of law, are who we are. They are part of our DNA and must be protected.”